English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center English thinne, thünne, thenne, from Previous English þynne, from Proto-West Germanic *þunnī, from Proto-Germanic *þunnuz (skinny) – evaluate *þanjaną (to stretch, unfold out) – from Proto-Indo-European *ténh₂us (skinny), from *ten- (to stretch).

Cognate with German dünn, Dutch dun, West Frisian tin, Icelandic þunnur, Danish tynd, Swedish tunn, Latin tenuis, Irish tanaí, Welsh tenau, Latvian tievs, Sanskrit तनु (tanú, skinny), Persian تنگ(tang, slender). Doublet of tenuis. Additionally associated to tenuous.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

skinny (comparative thinner, superlative thinnest)

  1. Having little thickness or extent from one floor to its reverse.

    skinny plate of metallic;  skinny paper;  skinny board;  skinny protecting

  2. Very slender in all diameters; having a cross part that’s small in all instructions.

    skinny wire;  skinny string

  3. Having little physique fats or flesh; slim; slender; lean; gaunt.
    skinny particular person
  4. Of low viscosity or low particular gravity.
    Water is thinner than honey.
  5. Scarce; not shut, crowded, or quite a few; not filling the area.
    The timber of a forest are skinny; the corn or grass is skinny.
    • 1705 (revised 1718), Joseph Addison, Remarks on A number of Components of Italy
      Ferrara could be very giant, however extraordinarily skinny of individuals.
  6. (golf) Describing a poorly performed golf shot the place the ball is struck by the underside a part of the membership head. See fats, shank, toe.
  7. Missing physique or quantity; small; feeble; not full.
    • c. 1690, John Dryden, Don Sebastian, King of Portugal
      skinny, hole sounds, and lamentable screams
  8. Slight; small; slender; flimsy; superficial; insufficient; not enough for a protecting.
    a skinny disguise
  9. (aviation) Of a route: comparatively little used.
    • 2016, Hartmut Wolf, ‎Peter Forsyth, ‎David Gillen, Liberalization in Aviation (web page 105)
      In brief, we beforehand discovered that skinny routes profit from a rise in competitors within the Spanish airline market when contemplating routes that had been monopoly routes in 2001.
  10. Poor; scanty; with out cash or success.
    • 1945, Jack Henry, What Value Crime? (web page 92)
      Like their associates the “draggers,” the “hoisters” or shoplifters are having a skinny time nowadays, []

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Noun[edit]

skinny (plural thins)

  1. (philately) A loss or tearing of paper from the again of a stamp, though not enough to create an entire gap.
  2. Any meals produced or served in skinny slices.
    chocolate mint thins
    potato thins

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

skinny (third-person singular easy current thins, current participle thinning, easy previous and previous participle thinned)

  1. (transitive) To make skinny or thinner.
  2. (intransitive) To turn into skinny or thinner.
    The crowds thinned after the procession had handed: there was nothing extra to see.
  3. To dilute.
  4. To take away some vegetation or elements of vegetation with a purpose to enhance the expansion of what stays.
    • 2015 September 5, Mark Diacono, “In reward of the Asian pear”, in The Each day Telegraph (Gardening)[1], archived from the unique on 12 September 2015, web page 3:

      So floriferous are Asian pears, and the tree so laden with younger fruit, that because the tree approaches maturity it’s value contemplating thinning the fruit (I am unable to fairly convey myself to skinny the flowers) in order to neither overburden the tree for this yr nor tire it for the following. Thinning early within the season, whereas the fruit is small, is good.

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

skinny (comparative extra skinny, superlative most skinny)

  1. Not thickly or carefully; in a scattered state.
    seed sown skinny
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, A Discourse of a Conflict with Spain
      Spain is a nation skinny sown of individuals.

Additional studying[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Center English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Determiner[edit]

skinny (subjective pronoun þou)

  1. Various type of þin.

Pronoun[edit]

skinny (subjective þou)

  1. Various type of þin.

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adjective[edit]

skinny

  1. Various type of thinne

Etymology 3[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

skinny

  1. Various type of thyn

Previous Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *þīn.

Determiner[edit]

thīn

  1. thy, your (singular)
  2. thine, yours

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Additional studying[edit]

  • “thīn”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Previous Excessive German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

thīn

  1. Various type of din

References[edit]

  1. Joseph Wright, An Previous Excessive German Primer, Second Version

Previous Saxon[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *þīn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

thīn

  1. thy, your (singular)
  2. thine, yours
Declension[edit]

See additionally[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Altsächsisches Wörterbuch, (5. Auflage) 2014
  2. Altsächsisches Elementarbuch by Dr. F. Holthausen

Etymology 2[edit]

See right here.

Determiner[edit]

skinny

  1. instrumental singular masculine/neuter of thē

Noun[edit]

skinny

  1. Aspirate mutation of tin.

Mutation[edit]

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