English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English reren (to boost), from Previous English rǣran (to boost, set upright, promote, exalt, start, create, give rise to, excite, rouse, arouse, fire up), from Proto-Germanic *raizijaną, *raisijaną (to trigger to rise, elevate), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rey- (to carry oneself, rise).

Cognate with Scots rere (to assemble, construct, rear), Icelandic reisa (to boost), Gothic 𐍂𐌰𐌹𐍃𐌾𐌰𐌽 (raisjan, to trigger to rise, carry up, set up), German reisen (to journey, actually to rear up and depart); and a doublet of elevate. Extra at rise.

Associated to rise and lift, which is used for a number of of its now archaic or out of date senses and for a few of its senses which are at present extra widespread in different dialects of English.

Different types[edit]

Verb[edit]

rear (third-person singular easy current rears, current participle rearing, easy previous and previous participle reared)

  1. (transitive) To carry as much as maturity, as offspring; to coach; to instruct; to foster.
    • 1694, Thomas Southerne, Isabella: Or The Deadly Marriage
      He needs a father to guard his youth, and rear him as much as advantage.
  2. (transitive, mentioned of individuals in direction of animals) To breed and lift.

    The household has been rearing cattle for 200 years.

  3. (intransitive) To stand up on the hind legs

    The horse was shocked, and thus reared.

  4. (intransitive, often with “up”) To get offended.
  5. (intransitive) To rise excessive above, tower above.
  6. (transitive, literary) To lift bodily or metaphorically; to carry up; to trigger to rise, to raise.
    Poverty reared its ugly head. (appeared, began, started to have an impact)
    The monster slowly reared its head.
    • 1835, Lord Lytton, Rienzi, the Final of the Roman Tribunes
      Mine [shall be] the primary hand to rear her banner.
  7. (transitive, uncommon) To assemble by constructing; to arrange
    to rear defenses or homes
    to rear one authorities on the ruins of one other.
  8. (transitive, uncommon) To lift spiritually; to carry up; to raise morally.
    • 1700, Isaac Barrow, Of Business…
      It reareth our hearts from useless ideas.
  9. (transitive, out of date) To carry and take up.
  10. (transitive, out of date) To awaken; to strip up.
    • 1684, John Dryden, The Second Epode of Horace
      And seeks the tusky boar to rear.
Utilization notes[edit]
  • It’s normal US English to boost kids, and this utilization has grow to be widespread in all types of English because the 1700s. Till pretty just lately, nevertheless, US lecturers taught the normal rule that one ought to elevate crops and animals, however rear kids, even if this contradicted normal utilization. It’s due to this fact not stunning that some individuals nonetheless favor to rear kids and that that is thought-about right however formal in US English. It’s widespread in UK English and never thought-about formal.
  • It’s typically thought-about incorrect to rear crops or (grownup) animals in US English, however this expression is widespread in UK English.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (stand up on the hind legs): prance
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English reren, from Previous English hrēran (to maneuver, shake, agitate), from Proto-Germanic *hrōzijaną (to stir), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱera-, *ḱrā- (to combine, stir, cook dinner). Cognate with Dutch roeren (to stir, shake, whip), German rühren (to stir, beat, transfer), Swedish röra (to the touch, transfer, stir), Icelandic hræra (to stir).

Different types[edit]

Verb[edit]

rear (third-person singular easy current rears, current participle rearing, easy previous and previous participle reared)

  1. (transitive) To maneuver; stir.
  2. (transitive, of geese) To carve.
    Rere that goose!
  3. (regional, out of date) To revive, carry to life, quicken. (solely within the phrase, to rear to life)

    He healeth the blind and he reareth to life the lifeless.

    (Speculum Sacerdotale c. 15th century)

Utilization notes[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Center English rere, from Previous English hrēr, hrēre (not completely cooked, underdone, flippantly boiled), from hrēran (to maneuver, shake, agitate), from Proto-Germanic *hrōzijaną (to stir), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱera-, *ḱrā- (to combine, stir, cook dinner). Associated to Previous English hrōr (stirring, busy, lively, sturdy, courageous), Dutch roeren (to stir, shake, whip), German rühren (to stir, beat, transfer), Swedish röra (to the touch, transfer, stir), Icelandic hræra (to stir).

Different types[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rear (comparative rearer or extra rear, superlative rearest or most rear)

  1. (now mainly dialectal) (of eggs) Underdone; practically uncooked.
  2. (mainly US) (of meats) Uncommon.
    • 2017, Dr. Ardeshir Irani, Quick Tales of the Previous Wild West
      Fred ordered a rear steak together with a glass of beer as he took a seat at an empty desk
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Center English rere, from Anglo-Norman rere, in the end from Latin retro. Evaluate arrear. Doublet of retro.

Adjective[edit]

rear (not comparable)

  1. Being behind, or within the hindmost half; hindmost

    the rear rank of an organization

    sit within the rear seats of a automotive

Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

rear (comparative extra rear, superlative most rear)

  1. (Britain, dialect) early; quickly
    • 1714, John Homosexual, The Shepherd’s Week
      Then why does Cuddy depart his cot so rear!

Noun[edit]

rear (plural rears)

  1. The again or hindmost half; that which is behind, or final on order; – against entrance.
  2. (navy) Particularly, the a part of a military or fleet which comes final, or is stationed behind the remainder.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Ebook 2”, in Paradise Misplaced. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Misplaced in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554, line 78:

      When the fierce Foe held on our brok’n Rear

  3. (anatomy) The buttocks, a creature’s backside
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations beneath should be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Verb[edit]

rear (third-person singular easy current rears, current participle rearing, easy previous and previous participle reared)

  1. To put within the rear; to safe the rear of.
  2. (transitive, vulgar, Britain) To sodomize (carry out anal intercourse)
Derived phrases[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Verb[edit]

rear

  1. first-person singular current lively subjunctive of reor

Swedish[edit]

Verb[edit]

rear

  1. current tense of rea.

Anagrams[edit]

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