English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center English pīpe, pype (hole cylinder or tube used as a conduit or container; duct or vessel of the physique; musical instrument; monetary data maintained by the English Exchequer, pipe roll), from Outdated English pīpe (pipe (musical instrument); the channel of a small stream),[1] from Proto-Germanic *pīpǭ. Bolstered by Vulgar Latin *pīpa, from Latin pipire, pipiare, pipare, from pīpiō (to chirp, peep), of imitative origin.

The “storage container” and “liquid measure” senses are derived from Center English pīpe (giant storage receptacle, significantly for wine; cask, vat; measure of quantity), from pīpe (above) and Outdated French pipe (liquid measure).[2]

The verb is from Center English pīpen, pypyn (to play a pipe; to make a shrill sound; to talk with a high-pitched tone), from Outdated English pīpian (to pipe).[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pipe (plural pipes)

  1. Meanings regarding a wind instrument.
    1. (music) A wind instrument consisting of a tube, usually lined with holes to permit for adjustment in pitch, sounded by blowing into the tube. [from 10th c.]
      • 1913, Fred[eric] E[dward] Weatherly (lyrics), “Danny Boy: Music Tailored from an Outdated Irish Air”, New York, N.Y.; London: Boosey & Co [], OCLC 82744196, web page 1:

        Oh, Danny boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling / From glen to glen, and down the mountain aspect, / The summer season’s gone and all of the roses falling, / It is you, it is you will need to go and I need to bide.

    2. (music) A tube used to supply sound in an organ; an organ pipe. [from 14th c.]
      • 1980, Harvey E[lliott] White; Donald H. White, “Wind Devices”, in Physics and Music: The Science of Musical Sound, Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders School Pub./Holt, Rinehart and Winston, →ISBN, web page 245; republished Mineola, N.Y.: Dover Publications, 2014, →ISBN, half 3 (Musical Devices), part 18.7 (The Theater Organ), web page 245:

        Most theater organs use many units (ranks) of reed and flue pipes of varied shapes, pipe scales, and so forth to generate quite a lot of timbres.

    3. The important thing or sound of the voice. [from 16th c.]
      • c. 1601–1602, William Shakespeare, “Twelfe Evening, or VVhat You VVill”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene iv], web page 257, column 2:

        For they ſhall but belye thy joyful yeeres, / That ſay thou artwork a person: Dianas lip / Shouldn’t be extra ſmooth, and rubious: thy ſmall pipe / Is because the maidens organ, ſhrill, and ſound, / And all is ſemblatiue a womans half.

    4. A high-pitched sound, particularly of a chicken. [from 18th c.]
      • 1847, Alfred Tennyson, The Princess: A Medley, London: Edward Moxon, [], OCLC 2024748, half IV, pages 66–67:

        Ah, unhappy and unusual as in darkish summer season dawns / The earliest pipe of half-awaken’d birds / To dying ears, when unto dying eyes / The casement slowly grows a glimmering sq.; / So unhappy, so unusual, the times which are no extra.

  2. Meanings regarding a hole conduit.
    1. A inflexible tube that transports water, steam, or different fluid, as utilized in plumbing and quite a few different purposes. [from 10th c.]
      • 2006, Richard M. Tanner, “Lockheed Tristar: Single-point Tanker”, in Historical past of Air-to-air Refuelling, Barnsley, South Yorkshire: Pen & Sword Aviation, Pen & Sword Books, →ISBN, half 2 (Expertise), web page 286, column 1:

        An ordinary Flight Refuelling Ltd Mk Eight probe nozzle was connected to the probe structural tube and gas pipe. The pipe was double-walled, and handed via into the fuselage aft of the flight deck; [] A non-return valve was fitted throughout the gas pipe aft of the probe nozzle, thus stopping any leakage of gas if the plane misplaced the probe nozzle inadvertently.

      1. (particularly in casual contexts) A water pipe.

        A burst pipe flooded my rest room.

        • 2000, Richard L. Valentine [et al.], “Chlorine and Monochloramine Decay in Batch and Loop Experiments”, in The Position of the Pipe–Water Interface in DBP Formation and Disinfectant Loss, Iowa Metropolis, Ia.: College of Iowa, →ISBN, web page 115:

          Corrosion management will be completed in distribution programs by including compounds that type a protecting movie on the pipe floor, thereby offering a barrier between the water and the pipe.

    2. A tubular passageway within the human physique corresponding to a blood vessel or the windpipe. [from 14th c.]
      • 1802, William Paley, “Of the Vessels of Animal Our bodies”, in Pure Theology or Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of the Deity, Philadelphia, Pa.: John Morgan, [], OCLC 950913714, pages 125–126:

        Amongst the vessels of the human physique, the pipe which conveys the saliva from the place the place it’s made, to the place the place it’s wished, deserves to be reckoned amongst probably the most intelligible items of mechanism with which we’re acquainted.

    3. (slang) A person’s penis.
      • 2006, Monique A. Williams, Neurotica: An Trustworthy Examination into City Sexual Relations, [Morrisville, N.C.]: Lulu Enterprises, →ISBN, web page 7:

        He grabs my legs and throws them over his shoulders, placing his massive pipe inside me []

      • 2010, Eric Summers, editor, Teammates, Sarasota, Fla.: StarBooks, →ISBN, web page 90:

        He punctuated his demand with a deep thrust up CJ’s gap. His large pipe drove nearly all the best way in, pulsing in opposition to his fingers beside it.

      • 2011, Mickey Erlach, Health club Buddies & Buff Boys, Sarasota, Fla.: StarBooks, →ISBN, web page 64:

        He laughed as he knelt down between Duncan’s splayed thighs and tore open a packaged condom, then rolled it down over his massive fuck-pipe.

  3. Meanings regarding a container.
    1. A big container for storing liquids or foodstuffs; now particularly a vat or cask of cider or wine. [from 14th c.]
      • 1808–10, William Hickey, Memoirs of a Georgian Rake, Folio Society 1995, p. 329:
        Mr Barretto knowledgeable us he had shipped 2 hundred and forty pipes of Madeira [which] not solely impeded the ship’s progress by making her too deep within the water, however vastly elevated her movement.
      • 1846, Edgar Allan Poe, “The Cask of Amontillado”, in The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, quantity I, New York: W. J. Widdleton, revealed 1849, web page 347, OCLC 38115823:

        My expensive Fortunato, you’re fortunately met. How remarkably nicely you’re looking to-day! However I’ve acquired a pipe of what passes for Amontillado, and I’ve my doubts.

    2. The contents of such a vessel, as a liquid measure, generally set at 126 wine gallons; half a tun. [from 14th c.]
      • 1882, James E[dwin] Thorold Rogers, “Weights and Measures”, in A Historical past of Agriculture and Costs in England from the 12 months after the Oxford Parliament (1259) to the Graduation of the Continental Warfare (1793) [], quantity IV (1401–1582), Oxford: On the Clarendon Press, OCLC 847909287, web page 205:

        Once more, by 28 Hen. VIII, cap. 14, it’s re-enacted that the tun of wine ought to include 252 gallons, a butt of Malmsey 126 gallons, a pipe 126 gallons, a tercian or puncheon 84 gallons, a hogshead 63 gallons, a tierce 41 gallons, a barrel 31½ gallons, a rundlet 18½ gallons.

  4. Meanings regarding one thing resembling a tube.
    1. Ornamental edging stitched to the hems or seams of an object made of cloth (clothes, hats, curtains, pillows, and many others.), usually in a contrasting coloration; piping. [from 15th c.]
    2. A sort of pasta much like macaroni.
    3. (geology) A vertical conduit via the Earth’s crust beneath a volcano via which magma has handed, usually stuffed with volcanic breccia. [from 19th c.]
      • 1995 March, Jon Bowermaster, “Diamond Rush within the Arctic”, in Fred Abatemarco, editor, In style Science, quantity 246, quantity 3, New York, N.Y.: Occasions Mirror Magazines, ISSN 0161-7370, OCLC 798962369, web page 83, columns 2–3:

        Whereas the pipe of a traditional volcano could lengthen down 50 miles or so, the volcanic pipes that decide up diamonds alongside the best way needed to go a lot deeper, maybe as deep as 300 miles.

    4. (lacrosse) One of many goalposts of the objective.
    5. (mining) An elongated or irregular physique or vein of ore. [from 17th c.]
    6. (Australia, colloquial, historic) An nameless satire or essay, insulting and ceaselessly libellous, written on a bit of paper which was rolled up and left someplace public the place it could possibly be discovered and thus unfold, to embarrass the creator’s enemies. [from 19th c.]
      • 1818 September 26, “Sydney. [Criminal Court.]”, in Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, quantity XVI, quantity 775, Sydney, N.S.W.: By authority [government printer], OCLC 958597594, web page 3, columns 2–3:

        On Thursday Mr. William Bland, previously a Surgeon within the Royal Navy, [] was delivered to trial on a cost of libelling the Governor [Lachlan Macquarie], by the composition and publishing of varied letters and verses contained in a manuscript guide dropped on the Parramatta Highway—and thence delivered to gentle. [] [H]owever lenient the sentence handed upon this younger man, but, it’s a lot to be hoped, that from his instance pipe-making will in future be reposed solely within the fingers of Mr. Wm. Cluer [an earthenware pipe maker] of the Brickfield Hill.
  5. Meanings regarding computing.
    1. (computing) A mechanism that allows one program to speak with one other by sending its output to the opposite as enter. [from 20th c.]
    2. (computing, slang) A knowledge spine, or broadband Web entry. [from 20th c.]

      A fats pipe is a high-bandwidth connection.

    3. (computing, typography) The character |. [from 20th c.]
  6. Meanings regarding a smoking implement.
    1. (smoking) A hole stem with a bowl at one finish used for smoking, particularly a tobacco pipe but in addition together with numerous different kinds corresponding to a water pipe. [from 16th c.]
      • 1843 December 19, Charles Dickens, “Stave 4. The Final of the Spirits.”, in A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, London: Chapman & Corridor, [], OCLC 55746801, web page 129:

        Sitting in among the many wares he dealt in, by a charcoal-stove, product of previous bricks, was a gray-haired rascal, practically seventy years of age; who had screened himself from the chilly air with out, by a frousy curtaining of miscellaneous tatters, hung upon a line; and smoked his pipe in all the posh of calm retirement.

      • 1892, Walter Besant, “The Choose Circle”, in The Ivory Gate: A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 16832619, web page 46:

        In former days each tavern of reputation saved such a room for its personal choose circle—a membership, or society, of habitués, who met each night for a pipe and a cheerful glass.

    2. (Canada, US, colloquial, historic) The gap travelled between two relaxation intervals throughout which one might smoke a pipe. [from 18th c.]

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

  • (smoking implement): briar

Descendants[edit]

Derived phrases[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations beneath have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry format § Translations.

Verb[edit]

pipe (third-person singular easy current pipes, current participle piping, easy previous and previous participle piped)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To play (music) on a pipe instrument, corresponding to a bagpipe or a flute.
    • 1605, R[ichard] V[erstegan], “Of the Antient Method of Dwelling of Ovr Saxon Ancestors. []”, in A Restitution of Decayed Intelligence: In Antiquities. Regarding the Most Noble and Renovvmed[sic, meaning Renovvned] English Nation. [], printed at Antwerp: By Robert Bruney; [] [a]nd to be offered [], by Iohn Norton and Iohn Invoice, OCLC 1080139422; republished London: Printed by Iohn Invoice, [], 1628, OCLC 52073409, web page 85:

      [T]he pide Piper with a ſhrill pipe went piping via the ſtreets, and forthwith the rats got here all working out of the houſes in nice numbers after him; all which hee led into the riuer of Weaſer and therein drowned them.
  2. (intransitive) To shout loudly and at excessive pitch.
    • 1922 October 26, Virginia Woolf, chapter II, in Jacob’s Room, Richmond, London: [] Leonard & Virginia Woolf on the Hogarth Press, OCLC 19736994; republished London: The Hogarth Press, 1960, OCLC 258624721, web page 17:

      “Ar—cher—Ja—cob!” Johnny piped after her, pivoting spherical on his heel, and strewing the grass and leaves in his fingers as if he had been sowing seed.

  3. (intransitive) To emit or have a shrill sound like that of a pipe; to whistle.
    • 1827, William Wordsworth, “The Brothers”, in The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth. In 5 Volumes, quantity I, London: Printed for Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Inexperienced, [], OCLC 7589693, web page 125:

      [W]ith the mariners / A fellow-mariner,—and so had fared / Via twenty seasons; however he had been rear’d / Among the many mountains, and he in his coronary heart / Was half a Shepherd on the stormy seas. / Oft within the piping shrouds had Leonard heard / The tones of waterfalls, and inland sounds / Of caves and timber: []

  4. (intransitive, metallurgy) Of a metallic ingot: to turn into hole within the means of solidifying.
  5. (transitive) To convey or transport (one thing) by the use of pipes.
  6. (transitive) To put in or configure with pipes.
  7. (transitive) To dab moisture away from.
    • 1881–1882, Robert Louis Stevenson, “Narrative Resumed by Jim Hawkins: The Garrison within the Stockade”, in Treasure Island, London; Paris: Cassell & Firm, revealed 14 November 1883, OCLC 702939134, half IV (The Stockade), pages 153–154:

      Our chimney was a sq. gap within the roof; it was however just a little a part of the smoke that discovered its approach out, and the remainder eddied about the home, and saved us coughing and piping the attention.

  8. (transitive, figuratively) To steer or conduct as if by pipes, particularly by wired transmission.
    • 2009, Susan Van Allen, “Church buildings Devoted to Feminine Saints—Rome”, in 100 Locations in Italy Each Girl ought to Go, Palo Alto, Calif.: Vacationers’ Tales, Solas Home, →ISBN, part I (The Divine: Goddesses, Saints, and the Blessed Virgin Mary), web page 20:

      Tender baroque music pipes via the ornate, dripping-with-gold church sanctuary.

  9. (transitive, computing, mainly Unix) To instantly feed (the output of 1 program) as enter to a different program, indicated by the pipe character (|) on the command line.
  10. (transitive, cooking) To create or enhance with piping (icing).

    to pipe flowers on to a cupcake

    • 1998, Nicholas Lodge; Janice Murfitt, The Worldwide Faculty of Sugarcraft: E-book One: Learners, London: Merehurst Press, →ISBN, web page 108:

      This implies a amount of runouts will be made prematurely, permitting extra time to flat ice and pipe the cake.

  11. (transitive, nautical) To order or sign by a observe sample on a boatswain’s pipe.
    • 1888–1891, Herman Melville, “[Billy Budd, Foretopman.] Chapter XXIII.”, in Billy Budd and Different Tales, London: John Lehmann, revealed 1951, OCLC 639975898, web page 298:

      Pipe down the starboard watch, boatswain, and see that they go.

  12. (transitive, slang, of a male) To have sexual activity with a feminine.
  13. (transitive, slang, dated) To see.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:see
    • 1879 October, J[ohn] W[illiam] Horsley, “Autobiography of a Thief in Thieves’ Language”, in Macmillan’s Journal, quantity XL, quantity 240, London: Macmillan and Co. [], OCLC 1005958675, web page 505, column 1:

      So I went and laid down on the grass. Whereas laying there I piped a reeler whom I knew. He had a nark (a policeman’s spy) with him. So I went and appeared about for my two buddies, and advised them to look out for F. and his nark.

    • 1942 August 10, “Cinema: New Image [film review of The Pied Piper]”, in Time[1], archived from the unique on 25 August 2013:

      The Pied Piper (20th Century-Fox) pipes luxurious Monty (“The Beard”) Woolley out of his wheel chair for the primary time since he started enjoying The Man Who Got here to Dinner (TIME, Jan. 26) three years in the past. The change is nice for him. The belligerent previous nanny goat turns into a really human portrait of a crotchety, kindly Englishman caught in France by the Nazi invasion.

Derived phrases[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “pīpe, n.(1)” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 13 September 2018.
  2. ^ “pīpe, n.(2)” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 13 September 2018.
  3. ^ “pīpen, v.” in MED On-line, Ann Arbor, Mich.: College of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 13 September 2018.

Additional studying[edit]


Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From the Outdated French verb piper (to squeak, chirp), from Latin pipare (to squeak).

Noun[edit]

pipe f (plural pipes)

  1. tobacco pipe
  2. (vulgar) blowjob

Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From English pipe

Noun[edit]

pipe m (plural pipes)

  1. the pipe image (|)

Additional studying[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

pipe f

  1. plural of pipa

Anagrams[edit]


Center English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Outdated English pīpe, from Proto-Germanic *pīpǭ; strengthened by Vulgar Latin *pīpa; some senses are from Outdated French pipe.

Various kinds[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pipe (plural pipes or pipe)

  1. A pipe; a bit of tubing used as a channel (usually for fluids):
    1. A chunk of tubing which string or rope is inserted into.
    2. (medication) A syringe; a hole tube for medical removing or insertion.
    3. Some other medical system or gear based mostly round a chamber or pipe.
    4. A pipe (musical instrument) or an identical wind instrument.
    5. (uncommon) A pipe as a part of a musical instrument (e.g. bagpipes)
  2. A barrel or tub; a container or vessel for the storage of bulk items, particularly wine.
  3. A unit measuring the mass or quantity (equal to such a container).
  4. A file of a fee or audit performing as a part of the Pipe Rolls.
  5. An anatomical or bodily channel or passage, particularly one used for respiration.
  6. (uncommon) A tube-shaped assist or holder; one thing resembling a pipe however not used as one.
Associated phrases[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: pipe (see there for additional descendants)
  • Scots: pipe
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Outdated English pīpian.

Verb[edit]

pipe

  1. Various type of pipen

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is lacking or incomplete. Please add to it, or focus on it on the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

pipe f (plural pipes)

  1. (Jersey) 120 gallons

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Outdated Norse pípa, from Proto-Germanic *pīpǭ.

Noun[edit]

pipe f or m (particular singular pipa or pipen, indefinite plural piper, particular plural pipene)

  1. a chimney
  2. (smoking) a pipe
  3. an organ pipe
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

In the end from Proto-Germanic *pīpaną.

Verb[edit]

pipe (current tense piper, previous tense per or peip, previous participle pepet, current participle pipende, crucial pip)

  1. (intransitive) to chirp, squeek, to make a sound with a excessive pitch

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Outdated Norse pípa, from Proto-Germanic *pīpǭ.

Noun[edit]

pipe f (particular singular pipa, indefinite plural piper, particular plural pipene)

  1. a chimney
  2. (smoking) a pipe
  3. an organ pipe
Derived phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

In the end from Proto-Germanic *pīpaną.

Various kinds[edit]

Verb[edit]

pipe (current tense pip, previous tense peip, supine pipe, previous participle pipen, current participle pipande, crucial pip)

  1. (intransitive) to chirp, squeek, to make a sound with a excessive pitch

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English pipe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pipe m (uncountable)

  1. (computing) pipe (the redirection of the output of a course of instantly into the enter of one other)

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

pipe

  1. First-person singular (yo) current subjunctive type of pipar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) current subjunctive type of pipar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, additionally used with usted?) current subjunctive type of pipar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) crucial type of pipar.

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