English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Origin unknown;[1] first recognized to have come into use in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A., within the mid-1920s.

Noun[edit]

muggle (countable and uncountable, plural muggles) (initially US, slang, dated)

  1. (uncountable, mainly within the plural) Marijuana. [from mid 1920s]
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
    • 1933, Cecil de Lenoir, “Method down South”, in The Hundredth Man: Confessions of a Drug Addict, London: Jarrolds [], OCLC 11595494, web page 220:

      However there was a drug in New Orleans, though it took me over 9 months to search out out something about it—a drug of a really totally different and insidious type! […] It regarded like chopped hay, or dried clover, and was rolled up in a double brown cigarette paper. Briefly, a “muggles“, “weed”, or “mootie”, hashish indica, Indian hemp, or, to offer it its Mexican title, marijuana, which translated into English simply means Mary Jane!

    • 2007, Ron Chepesiuk, “The White Mayor”, in Gangsters of Harlem: The Gritty Underworld of New York’s Most Well-known Neighborhood, Fort Lee, N.J.: Barricade Books, →ISBN, web page 62:

      Whereas marijuana was nonetheless authorized in New York, businessmen wished to bundle Mezz [Mezzrow]’s muggle and switch it right into a high-powered legal enterprise. Whereas tempted, Mezz rejected these efforts, as effectively.
  2. (countable) A marijuana cigarette; a joint. [from mid 1920s]
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana cigarette
    • 1931 September 7, “Crime: Muggles”, in Time[1], New York, N.Y.: Time Warner Publishing, ISSN 0928-8430, OCLC 749127914, archived from the unique on 14 October 2014:

      Marijuana is quite a lot of hemp weed (Hashish sativa) lengthy widespread in Mexico, these days turning into widespread within the U. S. Its leaves might be dried, floor and rolled into cigarets, that are bootlegged beneath the title of “muggles,” “reefers,” or “Mary Warners.” Thinner, shorter than normal cigarets, “muggles” are comprised of the small delicate leaves of the feminine marijuana plant.

    • 1933, Cecil de Lenoir, “Method down South”, in The Hundredth Man: Confessions of a Drug Addict, London: Jarrolds [], OCLC 11595494, web page 226:

      “[…] Eddie, what is this cigarette? It tastes a bit like opium.” / “It’s a ‘muggles’, child—Mex marijuana; it received’t damage you any when you don’t inhale too deeply, however you’ll cross out when you do. […]”

    • 1933 June 12, “Scorching Ambassador”, in Time[2], New York, N.Y.: Time Warner Publishing, ISSN 0928-8430, OCLC 749127914, archived from the unique on 1 December 2007:

      Windy, muggle-smoking Louis Armstrong has by no means had endurance or talent to construct an orchestra of his personal. He’s pleased strutting earlier than any good scorching band the place he can introduce himself as “The Reverend Satchel Mouth” and proceed to triple-tongue a cornet at unbelievable pace.
    • 1938 July 1, Mansfield Information Journal, Mansfield, Oh.: Mansfield Journal Co., OCLC 12717004:

      However even then “muggle” smoking doesn’t have an effect on alongside a given sample. ” with hallucinations of terrifying extent,” [James Skelly] Wright mentioned, “he’s liable to run amok, leaving a path of crime – even homicide, in his wake.” Case after case wherein criminals have admitted smoking “muggles” signifies that is true, in keeping with Wright.
    • 1946, Milton ‘Mezz’ Mezzrow; Bernard Wolfe, “Give up Foolin’ with that Comb”, in Actually the Blues, New York, N.Y.: Random Home, OCLC 906105369; republished New York, N.Y.: Memento Press, 2011, →ISBN, ebook 1 (A Nothin’ however a Baby):

      “Ever smoke any muggles?” he requested me. “Man, that is some golden-leaf I introduced up from New Orleans, it will make you’re feeling good, take a puff.”

Etymology 2[edit]

See Muggle. The verb sense (“to deface, and many others., a geocache”) derives from the truth that individuals interfering with such objects are assumed to not be geocachers: see the noun sense 1.2.1.

Noun[edit]

muggle (plural muggles)

  1. Different letter-case type of Muggle
    1. An individual who has no magical talents.
      • 2005, Christine Wicker, Not in Kansas Anymore: A Curious Story of How Magic is Reworking America, New York, N.Y.: HarperSanFrancisco, →ISBN, web page 194:

        The magical and the muggle are separated by a river, vast and deep. I might see throughout, however I could not get throughout, […].

      • 2007 November 11, Lesley Oldfield, “Household break a eureka second”, in Sunday Solar, Newcastle upon Tyne: Attain plc, ISSN 0039-5315, OCLC 750638281:

        Because it was nearing Halloween, we had been in a position to be part of a potions class the place we might change liquids into myriad colors with the addition of drugs like dragon spit (muggle’s lemon juice).

    2. (by extension) An individual who lacks a specific capacity or talent; a non-specialist; additionally, an individual who will not be a member of a gaggle; an outsider.
      • 2005, David Harvie, Ben Trott, and Keir Milburn, editors, Shut Them Down!: The G8, Gleneagles 2005 and the Motion of Actions, Leeds, West Yorkshire: Dissent!; Brooklyn, New York, N.Y.: Autonomedia, →ISBN, web page 343:

        Some activists would possibly know little of this ‘exterior’, such is their facility to maneuver between activist areas and locations with out having to come across the ever-increasingly one-dimensional world wherein the ‘muggles’ reside.

      1. (geocaching, particularly) An individual not concerned within the pastime of geocaching.
        Antonym: geocacher
        • 2010, Paul Gillin; Dana Gillin, “Appendix A: Glossary”, in The Pleasure of Geocaching [], Fresno, Calif.: Quill Driver Books, →ISBN, web page 235:

          Use Stealth. Generally utilized in a spot with a excessive muggle-to-geocacher ratio.

        • 2016 February 16, Selina Powell, “The hidden world of geocaching in Marlborough”, in Marlborough Specific (reproduced on Stuff)‎[4], Blenheim, New Zealand: Stuff, ISSN 1170-070X, OCLC 173333254, archived from the unique on 16 Might 2020:

          Every time we made a discover [Teresa] Hinton would verify there have been no muggles, or non-geocachers, round earlier than taking the container from its hiding place.

        • 2018 February 6, Joseph Smith, “The ‘lifeless drop’ in Stokes Croft could also be greater than it seems”, in Bristol Submit[5], Bristol, Somerset: Attain plc, ISSN 2052-9473, OCLC 1065304350, archived from the unique on 10 February 2018:

          Caches might be hidden in a disguised container, or very small bundle, and one ingredient of issue is hiding caches in city areas, the place the hunter must keep away from being noticed by ‘muggles’ – the title given to these unaware of the game. Muggles shall be stunned on the scale of the key sport happening beneath their noses.

Verb[edit]

muggle (third-person singular easy current muggles, current participle muggling, easy previous and previous participle muggled)

  1. (transitive, geocaching) To deface, destroy, or take away a geocache.
    • 2010, Katy Grant, chapter 1, in Cover and Search, 1st commerce paperback version, Atlanta, Ga.: Peachtree Publishers, revealed 2012, →ISBN, web page 14:

      Okay, September 3. That was simply final Monday—Labor Day—so the geocache had been muggled someday through the previous week.

    • [2012, Allison Bruning, “Geocatching:[sic, meaning Geocaching] A Trendy Day Treasure Hunt”, in Reflections: Poems and Essays, [Bloomington, Ind.?]: Mountain Springs Home, →ISBN, web page 118:

      Stolen or vandalized geocaches are termed “muggled” or “plundered”.]

    • 2015 June 29, Dom Pleasure, “Dom Joly’s household geocaching treasure hunt in Spain and Portugal”, in The Unbiased[6], London: Unbiased Information & Media, ISSN 0951-9467, OCLC 750496934, archived from the unique on 6 September 2015:

      We returned the cache to its unique place and left it simply as we would discovered it. If a cache is interfered with, it is deemed to have been “muggled” and that is severely frowned upon by the Geochaching group.

Etymology 3[edit]

Origin unknown; attested in Berkshire, Devonshire, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Lancashire, Somersetshire, Staffordshire, the West Nation, Wiltshire, and Yorkshire in the UK.[2] The phrase is presumably a variant of muddle.

Verb[edit]

muggle (third-person singular easy current muggles, current participle muggling, easy previous and previous participle muggled)

  1. (intransitive, Britain, dialectal) Typically adopted by alongside: to reside or work in an unorganized and unplanned method; to muddle alongside.
    • 1872, Agrikler [pseudonym; Joseph Edwards], “Tha Man as Coodent Plaze Nubbody”, in Rhymes within the West of England Dialect. [], 2nd version, Bristol, Somerset: Leech and Taylor, [], OCLC 870917723, web page 39:

      And zo thay muggled alongside, ‘until tha volks all begun to make giame on them.

    • 1873, [Edward Jenkins], “Justices’ Justice and Statutes at Giant”, in Little Hodge, creator’s version, New York, N.Y.: Dodd & Mead, [], OCLC 3356381, web page 102:

      I may need a made out to muggle alongside if that’s the case be Mister Jolly would a rised my wages, or the Union might a saved on taken care o’ this final poor little un, until sich time as I would a married some’un to maintain the childern tidy; […]

    • 1877 Might, [Frances Hariott Wood], “The Outdated Crimson Faculty-house”, in W[illiam] Meynell Whittemore, editor, Sunshine for 1877. [], quantity 185, London: William Poole, [], OCLC 220194565, chapter VI (Widow Lawrence’s Story), web page 77, column 2:

      She would possibly actually be mentioned “to muggle alongside;” every part in her home was within the biggest state of confusion, and, it have to be added, dust.

    • 1889, [John Hutton Balfour Browne], “Standard”, in Instances and Days: Being Essays in Romance and Historical past, London; New York, N.Y.: Longmans, Inexperienced, and Co. [], OCLC 12911196, web page 28:

      He rose to no eminence and received via life someway, ‘muggled alongside,’ as Somersetshire individuals say.

    • [1903, “MUGGLE, v.1 and sb.2”, in Joseph Wright, editor, The English Dialect Dictionary: [], quantity IV (M–Q), London: Revealed by Henry Frowde, [], writer to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, OCLC 81937840, web page 195, column 1:

      MUGGLE, […] To muddle alongside, to reside in a muddling, haphazard method.]

    • 2010 October, Paul Tremblay, “Tour: Slipshod Safari”, in We Will By no means Reside within the Fortress, Toronto, Ont.: ChiZine Publications, revealed April 2013, →ISBN:

      [T]he tractor struggles and muggles via the overgrown tour path, the tall grass whispers on the underside of our cage, […]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “muggle, n.3”, in OED On-line Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford College Press, March 2003.
  2. ^ “MUGGLE, v.1 and sb.2” in Joseph Wright, editor, The English Dialect Dictionary: [], quantity IV (M–Q), London: Revealed by Henry Frowde, [], writer to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1903, →OCLC, web page 195, column 1.

Additional studying[edit]

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