English[edit]

Different types[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English mild, liht, leoht, from Outdated English lēoht, from Proto-Germanic *leuhtą, from Proto-Indo-European *lewktom, from the basis *lewk- (mild). Cognate with Scots licht (mild), West Frisian ljocht (mild), Dutch licht (mild), Low German licht (mild), German Licht (mild). Associated additionally to Swedish ljus (mild), Icelandic ljós (mild), Latin lūx (mild), Russian луч (luč, beam of sunshine), Armenian լույս (luys, mild), Historical Greek λευκός (leukós, white).

Noun[edit]

mild (countable and uncountable, plural lights)

  1. (physics, uncountable) Seen electromagnetic radiation. The human eye can usually detect radiation (mild) within the wavelength vary of about 400 to 750 nanometers. Close by shorter and longer wavelength ranges, though not seen, are generally referred to as ultraviolet and infrared mild.

    As you may see, this spacious dining-room will get quite a lot of mild within the mornings.

    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Movie star:

      Then got here a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall younger woman. She stood for a second holding her skirt above the dirty steps, [] , and the mild of the reflector fell full upon her.

    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, in The China Governess[1]:

      Right here the stripped panelling was warmly gold and the images, largely of the English college, have been mellow and delicate within the afternoon mild.

    • 2013 July 20, “Out of the gloom”, in The Economist, quantity 408, quantity 8845:

      [Rural solar plant] schemes are of little assist to trade or different heavy customers of electrical energy. Neither is solar energy but as low cost because the grid. For all that, the fast arrival of electrical mild to Indian villages is lengthy overdue. When the nationwide grid suffers its subsequent enormous outage, because it did in July 2012 when a whole bunch of thousands and thousands have been left at midnight, search for specks of mild within the villages.

    • 2016, VOA Studying English (public area)
      When the studio mild is on, I’m recording my night present.

  2. A supply of illumination.

    Put that mild out!

    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:

      He was pondering; however the glory of the tune, the swell from the good organ, the clustered lights, […], the peak and vastness of this noble fane, its antiquity and its energy—all these items appeared to have their half as causes of the thrilling emotion that accompanied his ideas.

  3. Religious or psychological illumination; enlightenment, helpful info.

    Are you able to throw any mild on this downside?

    • c. 1590–1591, William Shakespeare, “The Two Gents of Verona”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene i]:

      He shall by no means know / That I had any mild of this from thee.

  4. (within the plural, now uncommon) Info; items of knowledge; concepts, ideas.
    • , Guide I, New York 2001, web page 166:
      Now these notions are twofold, actions or habits […], that are sturdy lights and notions, which we could use after we will.
  5. A notable particular person inside a selected discipline or self-discipline.

    Picasso was one of many main lights of the cubist motion.

  6. (portray) The style wherein the sunshine strikes an image; that a part of an image which represents these objects upon which the sunshine is meant to fall; the extra illuminated a part of a panorama or different scene; against shade.
  7. A viewpoint, or facet from which an idea, particular person or factor is regarded.

    I am actually seeing you in a distinct mild at present.

    Magoon’s governorship in Cuba was seen in a unfavorable mild by many Cuban historians for years thereafter.

    • 1698, Robert South, Twelve Sermons upon A number of Topics and Events, “Why Christ’s Doctrine was Rejected by the Jews”
      Frequent consideration of a factor [] reveals it in its a number of lights and numerous methods of look.
    • Now if there was one factor that the animals have been fully sure of, it was that they didn’t need Jones again. When it was put to them on this mild, that they had no extra to say.
  8. A flame or one thing used to create fireplace.

    Hey, buddy, you bought a mild?

    • 1913, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Poison Belt[2]:

      “There’ll, I count on, be many such – presumably complete cities in flames – after we think about what number of folks could have dropped with lights of their arms.”

  9. A firework made by filling a case with a substance which burns brilliantly with a white or colored flame.
    a Bengal mild
  10. A window, or house for a window in structure.

    This facade has eight south-facing milds.

  11. The collection of squares reserved for the reply to a crossword clue.

    The typical size of a mild on a 15×15 grid is 7 or 8.

  12. (casual) A cross-light in a double acrostic or triple acrostic.
  13. Open view; a visual state or situation; public commentary; publicity.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “Measvre for Measure”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene ii]:

      The duke but would have darkish deeds darkly answered; he would by no means convey them to mild.

  14. The facility of notion by imaginative and prescient.
  15. The brightness of the attention or eyes.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene i]:

      He appeared to search out his manner with out his eyes; / For out o’door he went with out their helps, / And, to the final, bended their mild on me.

  16. A site visitors mild, or, by extension, an intersection managed by a number of that can face a traveler who’s receiving directions.

    To get to our home, flip proper on the third mild.

Synonyms[edit]
Hypernyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Translations[edit]

See mild/translations § Noun.

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English lighten, lihten, from Outdated English līhtan, lȳhtan, lēohtan (to lighten, illuminate, give mild, shine; develop mild, daybreak; mild, kindle), from Proto-Germanic *liuhtijaną, from *leuhtą +‎ *-janą. Cognate with German leuchten (to shine).

Verb[edit]

mild (third-person singular easy current lights, current participle lighting, easy previous and previous participle lit or lighted)

  1. (transitive) To begin (a fireplace).
    Synonym: set
    Antonyms: extinguish, put out, quench
    We lit the fireplace to get some warmth.
  2. (transitive) To set fireplace to; to set burning.
    Synonyms: ignite, kindle, conflagrate
    Antonyms: extinguish, put out, quench
    She lit her final match.
    • 1627, George Hakewill, Apologie [] of the Energy and Windfall of God
      if a thousand candles be all lighted from one
  3. (transitive) To light up; to offer mild for when it’s darkish.
    Synonyms: illuminate, mild up
    I used my torch to mild the way in which house by the woods within the night time.
    • 19th century’, Frederic Harrison, The Fortnightly Evaluate
      100 years in the past, to have lit this theatre as brilliantly as it’s now lighted would have price, I suppose, fifty kilos.
    • The Solar has set, and Vesper, to produce / His absent beams, had lighted up the sky.
  4. (intransitive) To develop into ignited; to take fireplace.
    Synonyms: catch fireplace, ignite, conflagrate
    This soggy match won’t mild.
  5. To attend or conduct with a light-weight; to point out the way in which to by the use of a light-weight.
  6. (transitive, pinball) To make (a bonus) out there to be collected by hitting a goal, and thus mild up the characteristic mild comparable to that bonus to point its availability.
    Gentle the additional ball by amassing 500 million factors within the wizard mode.
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under should be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Center English mild, liht, leoht, from Outdated English lēoht (luminous, vivid, mild, clear, resplendent, famend, lovely), from Proto-Germanic *leuhtaz (mild), from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (mild). Cognate with Saterland Frisian ljoacht (mild), Dutch licht, German licht.

Adjective[edit]

mild (comparative lighter, superlative lightest)

A mild-skinned black particular person.
  1. Having mild; vivid; clear; not darkish or obscure.

    The room is mild when the Solar shines by the window.

  2. Pale or whitish in coloration; extremely luminous and kind of poor in chroma.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt’s Sufferers:

      ‘Twas early June, the brand new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies within the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the Solar was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with mild inexperienced streaks the place the shoal confirmed.

    She had mild pores and skin.

  3. (of espresso) Served with further milk or cream.

    I like my espresso mild.

Synonyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Outdated English lēoht, līht, from Proto-West Germanic *lį̄ht, from Proto-Germanic *linhtaz or *līhtaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lengʷʰ- (mild).

Cognate with Dutch licht, German leicht, Swedish lätt, Norwegian lett, Albanian lehtë, Latin levis, Russian лёгкий (ljóxkij), Lithuanian lengvas, Sanskrit लघु (laghu).

Adjective[edit]

mild (comparative lighter, superlative lightest)

  1. Having little or comparatively little precise weight; not cumbrous or unwieldy.

    a mild load ; a lighter backpack after having eliminated the books ; mild weapons

    • 1712 September 1, Joseph Addison; Richard Steele, “THURSDAY, August 21, 1712 [Julian calendar]”, in The Spectator, quantity 463; republished in Alexander Chalmers, editor, The Spectator; a New Version, [], quantity V, New York, N.Y.: D[aniel] Appleton & Firm, 1853, OCLC 191120697:

      These weights didn’t exert their pure gravity [] insomuch that I couldn’t guess which was mild or heavy while I held them in my hand.
  2. Having little weight as in contrast with bulk; of little density or particular gravity.

    feathers and cork are mild ; oil is lighter than water

  3. Of quick or inadequate weight; weighing lower than the authorized, customary, or correct quantity; clipped or diminished.

    to challenge mild coin

  4. Missing that which burdens or makes heavy.
    1. Free from burden or obstacle; unencumbered.
    2. Evenly constructed; usually designed for velocity or small masses.

      a mild plane ; a mild tank

    3. (navy) Not closely armed; armed with mild weapons.

      mild infantry; a troop of mild horse

    4. (nautical, of a ship) Driving excessive due to no cargo; by extension, pertaining to a ship which is mild.

      if a ship is mild or partially loaded ; the mild draft of a vessel, or its mild displacement

    5. (rail transport, of a locomotive or include locomotives) With none piece of kit hooked up or hooked up solely to a caboose.

      the mild locomotives ; a locomotive could also be moved mild

    6. With low viscosity
  5. (cooking) Not heavy or soggy; spongy; nicely raised.

    a mild bread ; sponge cake is a mild cake

  6. Mild; having little power or momentum.
    This artist clearly had a mild, flowing contact.
  7. Simple to endure or carry out.
    mild duties round the home
    • Gentle sufferings give us leisure to complain.
  8. Low in fats, energy, alcohol, salt, and many others.
    This mild beer nonetheless will get you drunk when you have sufficient of it.
  9. Unimportant, trivial, having little worth or significance.
    I made some mild remark, and we moved on.
  10. (out of date) Unchaste, wanton.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.i:
      Lengthy after lay he musing at her temper, / A lot grieu’d to thinke that light Dame so mild, / For whose defence he was to shed his blood.
    • c. 1595–1596, William Shakespeare, “Loues Labour’s Misplaced”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene ii]:

      So don’t you; for you’re a mild lady.

    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Service provider of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene i]:

      A mild spouse doth make a heavy husband.

  11. Not encumbered; unembarrassed; away from impediments; therefore, lively; nimble; swift.
  12. (dated) Simply influenced by trifling concerns; unsteady; unsettled; unstable.
    a mild, useless particular person; a mild thoughts
    • 1633, John Tillotson, The Knowledge of being Spiritual
      There isn’t any higher argument of a mild and thoughtless particular person than profanely to scoff at faith.
  13. Indulging in, or inclined to, levity; missing dignity or solemnity; frivolous; ethereal.
    Ogden Nash was a author of mild verse.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene ii]:

      Seneca can’t be too heavy, nor Plautus too mild.

    • 1851, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Outdated Information
      specimens of New England humour laboriously mild and lamentably mirthful
  14. Not fairly sound or regular; considerably impaired or deranged; dizzy; giddy.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Othello, the Moore of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Revealed In response to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, printed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act IV, scene i]:

      Are his wits secure? Is he not mild of mind?

  15. Simply interrupted by stimulation.
    mild sleep; mild anesthesia
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
  • (of little weight): heavy, weighty, burdensome
  • (lightly-built): cumbersome, heavyweight, large
  • (having little power or momentum): forceful, heavy, robust
  • (low in fats, energy, and many others): calorific (excessive in energy), fatty (excessive in fats), robust (excessive in alcohol)
  • (having little worth or significance): essential, necessary, weighty
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under should be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Adverb[edit]

mild (comparative lighter, superlative lightest)

  1. Carrying little.

    I want to journey mild.

Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

mild (plural lights)

  1. (curling) A stone that’s not thrown arduous sufficient.
  2. See lights (lungs).

Verb[edit]

mild (third-person singular easy current lights, current participle lighting, easy previous and previous participle lighted)

  1. (nautical) To unload a ship, or to jettison materials to make it lighter
  2. To lighten; to ease of a burden; to take off.
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Outdated English līhtan

Verb[edit]

mild (third-person singular easy current lights, current participle lighting, easy previous and previous participle lit or lighted)

  1. To seek out by probability.
    I lit upon a uncommon e book in a second-hand bookseller’s.
  2. To cease upon (of eyes or a look); to note
  3. (archaic) To alight; to land or come down.
    She fell out of the window however fortunately lit on her toes.
    • 1769, Benjamin Blayney (Ed.), King James Bible (Genesis 25:64)
      And Rebekah lifted up her eyes, and when she noticed Isaac, she lighted off the camel.
    • 1885, Theodore Roosevelt, Searching Journeys of a Ranchman
      Some sorts of geese in lighting strike the water with their tails first, and skitter alongside the floor for a number of toes earlier than settling down.
    • 1957, Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel), The Cat within the Hat
      And our fish got here down, too. He fell right into a pot! He mentioned, “Do I like this? Oh, no! I don’t. This isn’t a superb recreation,” Mentioned our fish as he lit.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English mild

Adjective[edit]

mild (invariable)

  1. mild, slight
  2. (of meals) eating regimen, low-fat, fat-free, mild

Center English[edit]

Different types[edit]

  • lighte, lyght, lyghte, liȝt, liȝte, lyȝt, lyȝte, lijȝt, liȝht, lyȝht, lyȝhte, liȝth, lyȝth, ligt, lygtte, ligth, liht, lihte, lyht, lyhte, lith, lithe, lyth, lythe, litht, lite, lyte, lit, lytte, lichte, lict, licth, liste, leoht, leocht, loht

Etymology[edit]

From Outdated English lēoht (mild, daylight; energy of imaginative and prescient; luminary; world), from Proto-West Germanic *leuht, from Proto-Germanic *leuhtą (mild), from Proto-Indo-European *lewktom, from the basis *lewk- (mild).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mild (plural lightes)

  1. The radiation which permits for imaginative and prescient by brightening objects and colors.
  2. Illumination usually, or any supply thereof.
  3. The metaphorical readability ensuing from philosophical or spiritual beliefs resembling reality, knowledge, righteousness, and many others.
  4. Psychological or non secular acuity; the presence of life in a residing being.
  5. (chemistry) The property of lustre; how shiny a substance is.
  6. (faith) Heavenly radiance; glory
  7. (structure) a gap in a wall permitting for the transmission of sunshine; a window.
  8. The sense of sight.
  9. The state of being simply seen.

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English mild.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mild (invariable, comparable)

  1. (of meals) mild (low in fats, energy, alcohol, salt or different undesirable substances)
    Synonym: leve

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English mild.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈlait/, [ˈlai̯t̪]

Adjective[edit]

mild (plural mild)

  1. mild (low in fats, energy, salt, alcohol, and many others.)
  2. (of cigarettes) mild (low in tar, nicotine and different noxious chemical substances)
  3. (by extension) Missing substance or seriousness; lite.

Utilization notes[edit]

  • As a overseas time period with unassimilated spelling and pronunciation, mild is normally rendered in italics in formal contexts or printed writings.

References[edit]

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