English[edit]

a fastening bolt with nut

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Center English bolt, from Previous English bolt, from Proto-Germanic *bultaz, maybe from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeld- (to knock, strike). Evaluate Lithuanian beldu (I knock), baldas (pole for putting).[1] Akin to Dutch and West Frisian bout, German Bolz or Bolzen, Danish bolt, Swedish bult, Icelandic bolti.

Noun[edit]

bolt (plural bolts)

  1. A (normally) metallic fastener consisting of a cylindrical physique that’s threaded, with a bigger head on one finish. It may be inserted into an unthreaded gap as much as the top, with a nut then threaded on the opposite finish; a heavy machine screw.
  2. A sliding pin or bar in a lock or latch mechanism.
  3. A bar of wooden or metallic dropped in horizontal hooks on a door and adjoining wall or between the 2 sides of a double door, to forestall the door(s) from being compelled open.
  4. (army, mechanical engineering) A sliding mechanism to chamber and unchamber a cartridge in a firearm.
  5. A small personal-armour-piercing missile for short-range use, or (in frequent utilization although deprecated by consultants) a brief arrow, meant to be shot from a crossbow or a catapult.
  6. A lightning spark, i.e., a lightning bolt.
  7. A sudden occasion, motion or emotion.

    The issue’s resolution struck him like a bolt from the blue.

    • 1994, Stephen Fry, The Hippopotamus Chapter 2
      With a bolt of fright he remembered that there was no toilet within the Hobhouse Room. He leapt alongside the hall in a panic, stopping by the long-case clock on the finish the place he flattened himself towards the wall.
  8. A big roll of material or comparable materials, as a bolt of fabric.
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, “All Astir”, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American version, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299, web page 106:

      Not solely have been the outdated sails being mended, however new sails have been approaching board, and bolts of canvas, and coils of rigging; in brief, every little thing betokened that the ship’s preparations have been hurrying to an in depth.

    1. (nautical) The usual linear measurement of canvas to be used at sea: 39 yards.
  9. A sudden spring or begin; a sudden leap apart.

    The horse made a bolt.

  10. A sudden flight, as to flee collectors.
    • 1887, Chalres Reader and Compton Reade, Charles Reade, Dramatist, Novelist, Journalist: A Memoir
      This gentleman was so hopelessly concerned that he contemplated a bolt to America — or anyplace.
  11. (US, politics) A refusal to assist a nomination made by the get together with which one has been related; a breaking away from one’s get together.
  12. An iron to lock the legs of a prisoner; a shackle; a fetter.
    • 1594, Christopher Marlowe, Edward II, London: William Jones,[1]
      He shall to jail, and there die in boults.
    • c. 1604, William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure, Act V, Scene 1,[2]
      Away with him to jail! Lay bolts sufficient upon him:
  13. A burst of pace or effectivity.
    • 2018 June 17, Barney Ronay, “Mexico’s Hirving Lozano stuns world champions Germany for good win”, in Katharine Viner, editor, The Guardian[3], London: Guardian Information & Media, ISSN 0261-3077, OCLC 229952407, archived from the unique on 5 August 2019:

      Within the occasion they lacked a correct midfield bolt, with Toni Kroos and Sami Khedira huffing round in pursuit of the whizzing inexperienced machine. The centre-backs regarded flustered, left to take care of three on two as Mexico broke. Löw’s 4-2-3-1 appeared antiquated and creaky, with the outdated World Cup shark Thomas Müller flat-footed in a large place.

Derived phrases[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.
See additionally[edit]

Verb[edit]

bolt (third-person singular easy current bolts, current participle bolting, easy previous and previous participle bolted)

  1. To attach or assemble items utilizing a bolt.

    Bolt the vice to the bench.

  2. To safe a door by locking or barring it.

    Bolt the door.

    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, “The Advocate”, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American version, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299, web page 122:

      If that double-bolted land, Japan, is ever to turn out to be hospitable, it’s the whale-ship alone to whom the credit score can be due; for already she is on the brink.

  3. (intransitive) To flee, to depart, to speed up out of the blue.

    Seeing the snake, the horse bolted.

    The actor forgot his line and bolted from the stage.

    • 1627, Michael Drayton, Nymphidia
      This Puck appears however a dreaming dolt, [] / And oft out of a bush doth bolt.
  4. (transitive) To trigger to start out or spring forth; to dislodge (an animal being hunted).

    to bolt a rabbit

  5. To strike or fall out of the blue like a bolt.
  6. (intransitive) To flee.
  7. (intransitive, botany) Of a plant, to develop shortly; to go to seed.

    Lettuce and spinach will bolt because the climate warms up.

    • 1995, Anne Raver, “Gandhi Gardening”, in Deep within the Inexperienced: An Exploration of Nation Pleasures, New York, N.Y.: Alfred A. Knopf, →ISBN:

      To be sincere, this hasn’t been my Backyard of Eden yr. [] The lettuce turned bitter and bolted. The Inexperienced Comet broccoli was good, however my coveted Romanescos by no means headed up.

  8. To swallow meals with out chewing it.
    • 1859 November 24, Charles Darwin, “Geographical Distribution”, in On the Origin of Species by Technique of Pure Choice, [], London: John Murray, [], OCLC 1029641431, web page 362:

      Some hawks and owls bolt their prey complete, and after an interval of from twelve to twenty hours, disgorge pellets, which, as I do know from experiments made within the Zoological Gardens, embrace seeds able to germination.

  9. To drink one’s drink in a short time; to down a drink.

    Come on, everybody, bolt your drinks; I need to go to the following pub!

  10. (US, politics) To refuse to assist a nomination made by a celebration or caucus with which one has been related; to interrupt away from a celebration.
  11. To utter precipitately; to blurt or throw out.
    • 1634 October 9 (first efficiency), [John Milton], H[enry] Lawes, editor, A Maske Offered at Ludlow Fortress, 1634: [] [Comus], London: Printed [by Augustine Matthews] for Hvmphrey Robinson, [], revealed 1637, OCLC 228715864; reprinted as Comus: [] (Dodd, Mead & Firm’s Facsimile Reprints of Uncommon Books; Literature Sequence; no. I), New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead & Firm, 1903, OCLC 1113942837, line 760, web page 26:

      I hate when vice can bolt her arguments.

Translations[edit]
The translations under have to be checked and inserted above into the suitable translation tables, eradicating any numbers. Numbers don’t essentially match these in definitions. See directions at Wiktionary:Entry structure § Translations.

Adverb[edit]

bolt (not comparable)

  1. All of the sudden; straight; unbendingly.
    The troopers stood bolt upright for inspection.

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Center English bulten, from Anglo-Norman buleter, Previous French bulter (fashionable French bluter), from a Germanic supply initially that means “bag, pouch” cognate with Center Excessive German biuteln (to sift), from Proto-Germanic *buzdô (beetle, grub, swelling), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūs- (to maneuver shortly). Cognate with Dutch buidel.

Verb[edit]

bolt (third-person singular easy current bolts, current participle bolting, easy previous and previous participle bolted)

  1. To sift, particularly via a fabric.
  2. To sift the bran and germ from wheat flour.
    Graham flour is unbolted flour.
  3. To separate, assort, refine, or purify by different means.
    • c. 1608–1609, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Coriolanus”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Printed In keeping with the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, revealed 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene i]:

      unwell schooled in bolted language

  4. (legislation) To debate or argue privately, and for observe, as instances at legislation.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Jacob to this entry?)
Derived phrases[edit]

Noun[edit]

bolt (plural bolts)

  1. A sieve, particularly an extended high-quality sieve utilized in milling for bolting flour and meal; a bolter.
    (Can we discover and add a citation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Low German bolt

Noun[edit]

bolt c (singular particular bolten, plural indefinite bolte)

  1. a bolt (threaded)
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

bolt (crucial bolt, current tense bolter, passive boltes, easy previous and previous participle bolta or boltet, current participle boltende)

  1. crucial of bolte

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian volta (vault).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bolt (plural boltok)

  1. store, retailer (particularly utilized to comparatively small outlets within the countryside)
    Synonyms: üzlet, áruház, kereskedés, árus
  2. vault
    Synonyms: boltozat, boltív, bolthajtás

Declension[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

See additionally the compound phrases containing -bolt with the sense of a store [store] under.

Derived phrases[edit]

(Word: Most compounds with üzlet as an affix within the sense of ’store, retailer’ may be expressed with bolt.)


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Low German bolt

Noun[edit]

bolt m (particular singular bolten, indefinite plural bolter, particular plural boltene)

  1. a bolt (threaded)
Derived phrases[edit]
Associated phrases[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

bolt

  1. crucial of bolte

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Center Norwegian boltr, from Center Low German bolte.

Noun[edit]

bolt m (particular singular bolten, indefinite plural boltar, particular plural boltane)

  1. a bolt (threaded)

Derived phrases[edit]

Associated phrases[edit]

References[edit]


Previous English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *bolt.

Evaluate Lithuanian beldu (I knock), baldas (pole for putting).[1] Akin to Dutch bout, German Bolz or Bolzen, Danish bolt, Icelandic bolti.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bolt m

  1. bolt

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


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